Hollywood Classics: Winter 2013

Hollywood Classics: Winter 2013

Hollywood Classics: Winter 2013

Hollywood Classics: Winter 2013

Hollywood Classics: Winter 2013

TIFF Cinematheque - Hollywood Classics

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This season's slate of vintage Hollywood favourites and rarities includes everything from pantheon classics and eye-popping silent spectacles to classic chillers, doom-haunted noirs and widescreen musical extravaganzas.

Films in Hollywood Classics: Winter 2013

    • Dracula
    • Tod Browning
    • Bela Lugosi set the standard for all screen Draculas to follow in the first official film adaptation of Bram Stoker's classic vampire novel.

    • No events playing at this time.
    • The Spiral Staircase
    • Robert Siodmak
    • A mute woman who works as a nurse in a gloomy old mansion fears that she has been targeted by a serial killer in this classic Gothic thriller.

    • No events playing at this time.
    • Wild Girl
    • Raoul Walsh
    • A backwoods vixen (Joan Bennett) laughs, loves and fights her way through the Sierra Nevada mountains in Raoul Walsh's hectic and hilarious hillbilly melodrama.

    • No events playing at this time.
    • Hangmen Also Die
    • Fritz Lang
    • Fritz Lang and Bertolt Brecht collaborated on this tense WWII thriller based on the real-life assassination of SS number-two man and "Butcher of Prague" Reinhard Heydrich.

    • No events playing at this time.
    • Carmen Jones
    • Otto Preminger
    • Dorothy Dandridge became the first African American to ever be nominated for the Best Actress Academy Award for her blazingly hot performance in Otto Preminger's electrifying widescreen musical.

    • No events playing at this time.
    • Intolerance
    • D.W. Griffith
    • D.W. Griffith's colossal, centuries-spanning spectacle is one of the most influential films in the history of cinema.

    • No events playing at this time.
    • Pursued
    • Raoul Walsh
    • Robert Mitchum stars as a man haunted (and hunted) by the demons of his past in this noir-ish, Freudian western by the great Raoul Walsh.

    • No events playing at this time.
    • Frankenstein
    • James Whale
    • "It's alive!" Boris Karloff became a screen icon for the ages as the green-skinned, flat-topped monster in the definitive film version of the classic horror tale.

    • No events playing at this time.
    • Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans
    • F.W. Murnau
    • F.W. Murnau's visionary tale of love imperilled and rekindled is considered the pinnacle of silent film art.

    • No events playing at this time.
    • Citizen Kane
    • Orson Welles
    • The most famous debut in film history and long regarded as the greatest film ever made, Orson Welles' legendary chronicle of the rise and fall of a Hearst-like newspaper magnate retains its power to enthrall, confound and overwhelm.

    • No events playing at this time.
    • The Thief of Bagdad
    • Raoul Walsh
    • A grinning, swashbuckling Douglas Fairbanks stars in this breathtaking Arabian Nights fantasia, one of the most expensive and elaborate films of the silent era.

    • No events playing at this time.
    • Marnie
    • Alfred Hitchcock
    • Sean Connery and Tippi Hedren star in Alfred Hitchcock's twisted tale of sexual pathology and compulsive crime.

    • No events playing at this time.

What is the greatest film ever made? If you're not already tired of pondering the recent Sight & Sound Top Ten poll — in which Hitchcock's fetishistic Vertigo finally displaced Welles' once invincible Citizen Kane to ascend to that hallowed status — take note that, following last season's presentation of The Searchers, this edition of Hollywood Classics completes our survey of the Hollywood titles in the new S&S rankings: Citizen Kane and Sunrise return to the Cinematheque screen, along with special 70mm presentations of both 2001: A Space Odyssey and Vertigo. And since many critics preferred Marnie to Madeleine as their tormented Hitchcock blonde, we also bring her strange and inexhaustible tale back for consideration.

Looking beyond the canon, the great Raoul Walsh receives a three-film mini-retrospective with a new restoration of the ur-swashbuckler The Thief of Bagdad, the totally delightful pre-Code Wild Girl (recently preserved by New York's Museum of Modern Art), and an archival restoration of the ever-intense Pursued, a noir western that looks forward to the Freudian fifties and pairs up nicely with Robert Siodmak's The Spiral Staircase, another mid-forties psychological thriller involving childhood trauma. The vintage chills of Frankensteinand Dracula, in new DCPs made to mark the centenary of the Universal studio, prove the ultimate in poetic horror, and the rest is spectacle: Otto Preminger's incendiary widescreen musical Carmen Jones and a new digital restoration of D. W. Griffith's epic Intolerance, one of the most influential films in the history of cinema.

—James Quandt

Thanks to Anne Morra and Mary Keene, The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Steven Hill and Todd Wiener, UCLA Film & Television Archive.